Move into Calm › Stress/Anxiety › Nikita Akilapa

These practices have been specifically created and sequenced for watching online on Movement for Modern Life to reduce stress and anxiety you may feel in your life.
Within our anti-stress and anxiety series, we have a range of practices which include:

Yin-yoga

which cultivates a deep sense of awareness.The perfect antidote to urban life, Yin focuses on releasing and letting go via the deep musculature of the body and connective tissues, aiding physical, energetic, mental and emotional flexibility.

Restorative Yoga

is passive, designed to adjust the nervous system and rest the adrenal glands, enabling the body to move towards balance.

All of the practices on this site are designed to increase your awareness on the breath and movement, which will intrinsicly help you deal with any stress/anxiety you may feel in everyday life.

 

  • Restorative Yoga for Pregnancy41:44
    Restorative Yoga for Pregnancy

    Nikita Akilapa

    Support and soothe your pregnant body with this peaceful restorative pregnancy yoga class. Find deep rest with relaxing and nourishing postures (supported sukhasana, legs up the wall, supported twist, reclining savasana). With restorative yoga, less is more. Spending extended time in each posture carries lots of physiological benefits. Beyond the physical, we can use the stillness as an opportunity to really be present with baby. You will need a bolster, yoga bricks if you have them, and access to a wall.



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  • Meditation: Soft Pause10:00
    Meditation: Soft Pause

    Nikita Akilapa

    In the final part in our Introduction to Meditation Series, we start to watch the top and the bottom of our breath. You'll notice that there are round edges to the inhale and exhale, where each breath gently reaches a peak and then gives rise to the next. Either simply watch these spaces between breaths or gently hold for a moment at the top of each inhale, and pause for a moment at the bottom of the exhale.



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  • Meditation: Exploring the Breath14:09
    Meditation: Exploring the Breath

    Nikita Akilapa

    In the fourth part in our Introduction to Meditation Series with Nikita, we learn how to explore breath patterns as a means to change the way we feel. Allow the exhale to be twice as long as the inhale to give the body a chance of releasing all the old, to make space for the fresh new oxygenated air to flow in fully. Start at an equal breath (e.g. inhale for six seconds and exhale for six seconds) then increase gradually to a ratio of 1:1.5 (e.g. inhaling for six seconds and exhaling for nine seconds). Eventually, breathing to a ratio of 1:2 (e.g. inhaling for six and exhaling for 12 seconds). Maintain for up to about 20 breaths and then return to normal breath. If you are asthmatic, you may find that it's tricky to get to the full 1:2 ratio at first, in which case stay at 1:1.5. This is another great technique you might want to use as a tool to anchor an anxious mind any time you feel overwhelmed.



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  • Meditation: Counting the Breath07:53
    Meditation: Counting the Breath

    Nikita Akilapa

    In the third part in our Introduction to Meditation series, we start to count the breath. Get settled in a comfortable spot, either sitting or lying down, and begin to count your breaths backwards from 20 to 1. Say to yourself mentally, I am breathing in 20, I am breathing out 20. I am breathing in 19, I am breathing out 19, and so on until you reach 1. If you notice your mind has wandered away from this focus, draw it back. If you lose your count, start again. If you manage to get all the way to 1, try starting at 50 next time. You might want to use this exercise as a tool to anchor an anxious mind any time you feel overwhelmed.



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  • Meditation: Feeling the Breath10:16
    Meditation: Feeling the Breath

    Nikita Akilapa

    In the second part in our introduction to meditation class we notice the breath within the body. Notice the body's involuntary response to your inhalations and exhalations; from the most obvious, loudest reactions (like the rise and fall of the chest, the expansion and release of the mid body) - to the more subtle and quieter ones (like the gentle drawing back behind the eyes as you inhale, to the sensation of the palms of the hands as you exhale). Notice how you feel before and after doing this short meditation class, you might be surprised at how effective just a few minutes in meditation can be!



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  • Meditation:Watching the Breath09:10
    Meditation:Watching the Breath

    Nikita Akilapa

    In this first introduction to meditation video we use the breath as our anchor. Learn how to pay close attention to your breath and how it feels in your body; start to explore all its qualities. Get really involved in all its personality - length, depth, temperature, quality. Fully inhabit it. Breathe in, knowing you are breathing in, breathe out, knowing you are breathing out. Use it as an anchor to the present moment. The minute you notice your mind drifting off to something else, make a point of bringing it right back. Keep the focus and enjoy this meditation introduction! Watch the intruction here: https://movementformodernlife.com/yoga-class-1238-meditation-series-introduction



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